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2/24/2017 | 1 MINUTE READ

Redesigned Turn-Mill Fits More Performance in Same Footprint

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PMTS 2017: Index will demonstrate its G200 turn-mill, a compact machine offering as much as 30 percent greater productivity than its predecessor in the same footprint.

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Index will demonstrate its G200 turn-mill, a compact machine offering as much as 30 percent greater productivity than its predecessor in the same footprint. The redesign of the machine resulted in an increase of the maximum turning length to 660 mm, a higher-performance milling spindle and expanded live tool complement as well as the XPanel with Internet 4.0 readiness.

The machine is said to offer flexibility and high-speed machining of both barstock and chucked parts complete in one setup.

Fluid-cooled main and counterspindles are designed identically and feature a bar capacity of 65 mm (chuck diameter maximum 165 mm). Their motorized spindles allow productive turning machining with a power of 31.5/32 kW (100/40 percent duty cycle), a torque of 125/170 Nm and a maximum speed of 6,000 rpm. The machine has three tool carriers, so tools can be assigned to almost any machining type on the main and counterspindles independently. This means great flexibility for the programmer in organizing the machining steps, the company says. Two 14-tool turrets are arranged symmetrically, each with an independent Y axis (±45 mm). All tool stations can be equipped with live tools.

A special feature is the upper tool carrier, which has an additional Y axis (±65 mm) and a 360-degree swiveling B axis. It is designed on one side to provide an added 14 tool positions and has a milling spindle on the rear. Its drive delivers speeds ranging to 7,200 rpm with 22 kW of power and 52 Nm of torque at 25 percent duty cycle. The upper turret head can swing into a horizontal position about the B axis and then move into the work area up to a position 30 mm below the spindle center. In this position, the turret can machine towards the main or counter spindle, or even simultaneously depending on the application.

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