11/10/2011 | 1 MINUTE READ

Rotary Table Positions Heavy Loads

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Fibro’s Fibromat heavy-load positioning table is designed to position large and heavy parts or equipment quickly and precisely, and is especially suited for car body assembly applications in the automobile industry.

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Fibro’s Fibromat heavy-load positioning table is designed to position large and heavy parts or equipment quickly and precisely, and is especially suited for car body assembly applications in the automobile industry. The table is driven by spur-gear toothing and can be equipped with pneumatic indexing. Unlike conventional positioning tables with a cylinder cam, this table’s gearbox is not self-inhibiting, so force is not transferred to the cam in case of a sudden power failure or emergency stop, and the table’s mechanical system is not damaged. In addition, the table does not swing open during positioning, even with superstructures on the table top.
 
The table’s modular design enables users to select a motor, or the table can be driven without a motor by hand or by robot. When equipped with a drive, the positioning table can accomplish a wider variety of applications. With two parallel drives, shorter switching times can be realized and the control response of large loads can be optimized.
 
In the standard version, it is equipped with an asynchronous servo-gear motor with a preconfigured drive converter. Other common motor types also can be used. The table thus can be synchronized as an additional axis on a robot using synchronous servo motors and actuated using the same set of commands as for the robot. The standard version features a large, center-bored hole especially for robot-supported applications.
 
The table is available with 1,000-, 1,250- and 1,600-mm diameters. The 1,000-mm size can accommodate superstructures as large as 6,000 mm in diameter and transport loads as large as 12 tons are possible.  
 

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