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Surface Roughness Gage for High-Production Shops

Smart Manufacturing Experience 2018: Blum-Novotest will present its TC64-RG surface roughness gage enabling automatic testing of workpiece surfaces in machine tools.

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Blum-Novotest will present its TC64-RG surface roughness gage enabling automatic testing of workpiece surfaces in machine tools. The product is designed to achieve automated, machine-internal measurement of surface quality, especially for customers in the high-production, serial manufacturing sector, which demands short measurement times along with reliability and precision. 

Based on Blum’s Digilog technology, the company’s engineers developed the new TC64-RG to be fully suitable for use in machine tools, resistant to coolants and built with IP68 protection. It performs measurements at high speed, according to the company. Standard milled, turned or ground surfaces can be tested with μm precision in just a few seconds and then analyzed in terms of the roughness parameters Ra, Rz and Rmax. The detected roughness values can either be documented for later use, output as a status value or displayed via the GUI.

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