Turn-Mill Capable of Additive Manufacturing

WFL Millturn Technologies will display the 4,500-mm M80 Millturn, a hybrid machine which combines turn-mill capabilities with additive manufacturing.

WFL Millturn Technologies will display the 4,500-mm M80 Millturn, a hybrid machine which combines turn-mill capabilities with additive manufacturing. The M80 has been equipped with a 6-kW high-performance laser for melting powdered metals and low-distortion hardening. The machine also provides high build-up rates for cladding, making it possible to create nearly any geometric form through the use of the machine’s NC-axis capabilities. This enables the efficient, complex manufacturing of cooling channels or curved, connecting flanges.

The company will also display the smaller M50 Millturn for gear cutting. 

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