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5/30/2016

Turn-Mill Enables Screw Machining Complete

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Weingärtner’s Pick Up 400 turning and milling center is designed for the manufacture of complex screw geometries such as extrusion and feed screws.

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Weingärtner’s Pick Up 400 turning and milling center is designed for the manufacture of complex screw geometries such as extrusion and feed screws. A workpiece clamping concept consisting of prismatic steady pads, headstock and tailstock combined with turning and milling capability enable the machine to machine extrusion and feed screws complete. The Pick Up 400 is available as a pure milling machine or turn-mill with and without tool magazine.

The machine is intended to be used with the company’s WeinCAD software for screw production. Operators can use their existing program data for production in a streamlined process.

Additional features include a fully enclosed working space with emulsion fog extraction and barrier-free access to the workpiece, automatic protective doors, and a control terminal that can be moved, rotated, and height-adjusted across the entire length of the machine.

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