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3/3/2010 | 1 MINUTE READ

Versatile Zero-Point Clamping System

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Lang’s Quick-Point zero-point clamping system is accurate within 0.005 mm and features a profile height of 27 mm.

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Lang’s Quick-Point zero-point clamping system is accurate within 0.005 mm and features a profile height of 27 mm. Base plates are available in a variety of sizes and shapes, including round, square and rectangular. Every plate contains four bores with a special fit for clamping studs. Actuation is achieved via a centrally located screw that can be operated manually, hydraulically or pneumatically.
 
The base plates are available in two configurations. The first features a clamping stud distance of 52 mm for 16-mm diameter studs and a maximum pull-down force of 4 metric tons. The other configuration features a stud distance of 96 mm for 20-mm diameter studs and a maximum pull-down force of 6 metric tons.
 
The clamping system is designed to increase flexibility and reduce setup costs, the company says. The option of mounting either a single base plate or multiple base plates as a grid system on the machine table allows quick change-over of vises, fixtures and special clamping devices. When changing batches, saving base plate zero-point positions in the machine control enables quick change-over with minimal setup time.
 
According to the company, the system enables secure and accurate mounting of large vises, fixtures or other plates onto the base plates. Using two base plates enables the studs to be mounted farther apart to accommodate larger vises and fixtures.

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