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5/11/2017

VMC Machines Hardened Steel Molds

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Amerimold 2017: JTEKT Toyoda Americas will demonstrate its Stealth 965 vertical machining center running a mold in hardened steel.

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JTEKT Toyoda Americas will demonstrate its Stealth 965 vertical machining center running a mold in hardened steel. Featuring a 900-mm (35.4") X axis, a 1,110 × 650 mm (43.3" × 25.6") table and a 900-kg (1,985-lb) load capacity, the boxway VMC is engineered to handle a range of challenging materials. Four hardened and ground Y-axis box guideways are integral to the single-piece casting, and are mated to a super-wide, inverted Y-shaped column. All metal-to-metal contact surfaces are hand-scraped for additional rigidity. This results in a better surface finish due to its extreme vibration dampening characteristics, the company says. A 200-block look-ahead prepares an optimal route for tooling while maintaining constant machining speed, resulting in a high-quality surface finish through curves and corners. 

Standard features include a temperature-controlled, 30-hp, direct-drive, 12,000-rpm spindle. Large precision spindle bearings provide high revolution accuracy, thermal stability and extended tool life.

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