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New Machines and Automation at Pfronten

Here’s some of what one editor saw at DMG/Mori Seiki’s 2013 open house in Pfronten, Germany.

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In late January 2013, I attended day one of DMG/Mori Seiki’s open house at its Deckel Maho production facility in Pfronten, Germany. That day there were more than 1,000 attendees who toured the production facility and saw the 70 machines on display (including six world premiers). There also was a wealth of automation solutions on hand, and attendees could see presentations on manufacturing topics that included automation as well as aerospace and automotive.

 

Check out the slideshow below to see a handful of shots from the event.

 

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