8/15/2008 | 1 MINUTE READ

End Mill Comparisons in CFRP, Part 1 - Carbide Tool

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Video shows the performance of coated carbide, diamond-coated, PCD and veined PCD tools in carbon fiber reinforced plastic. Part one in a four-part series.

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Smith MegaDiamond Inc. and Star Cutter Company compared the performance of various end mills in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). The tools tested included a coated carbide end mill, a diamond-coated end mill, a conventional PCD end mill with straight flutes, and a “veined” PCD end mll featuring a vein of PCD within a helical slot in a carbide tool body.

The table below summarizes the test parameters. Shown here is the video of a 30-degree helical coated carbide tool. Jeff Michael, engineering manager for Star Cutter, comments, The sound is pretty good for this cutter. It appears to be cutting well until the second pass, where there are visible uncut fibers after just a few feet of cutting.”

To see the next video in this testing, click here.

 

 

 

Tool Type

Ø .500 in.

Solid Carbide

CVD Diamond

PCD

Veined PCD

 

Flute angle

30° helical

10° helical

7° skew

30° helical

 

Spindle speed (rpm)

3,000

4,600

12,000

18,000

 

Chip load (in./tooth)

0.0035

0.0035

0.001

0.0065

Machine advance (in./min.)

42

64

36

470

 

Radial depth (in.)

.050

.050

.050

.050

Cutting speeds and feed rates were recommended parameters from each tool’s manufacturer.

 

Editor’s note: To read the next part in the series, click here

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