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8/13/2008

End Mill Comparisons in CFRP, Part 3 - Conventional PCD Tool

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Video shows the performance of coated carbide, diamond-coated, PCD and veined PCD tools in carbon fiber reinforced plastic. Part three in a four-part series.

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Smith MegaDiamond Inc. and Star Cutter Company compared the performance of various end mills in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). The tools tested included a coated carbide end mill, a diamond-coated end mill, a conventional PCD end mill with straight flutes, and a “veined” PCD end mill featuring a vein of PCD within a helical slot in a carbide tool body.

The table below summarizes the test parameters. Shown here is the video of a straight-flute segmented PCD tool. Jeff Michael, engineering manager for Star Cutter, comments, “Notice the sound includes pounding. This is the effect of the cutter loading and unloading because of the straight flutes. Also, there are uncut fibers because of the lack of shearing geometry.”

To see the next video in this testing, click here.

 

 

 

Tool Type

Ø .500 in.

Solid Carbide

CVD Diamond

PCD

Veined PCD

 

Flute angle

30° helical

10° helical

7° skew

30° helical

 

Spindle speed (rpm)

3,000

4,600

12,000

18,000

 

Chip load (in./tooth)

0.0035

0.0035

0.001

0.0065

Machine advance (in./min.)

42

64

36

470

 

Radial depth (in.)

.050

.050

.050

.050

Cutting speeds and feed rates were recommended parameters from each tool’s manufacturer.

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