8/5/2008

Five-Axis Trimming Of Composites

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Here is video of the five-axis motion required to trim a relatively simple composite component.

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Milling high-performance composites does not make extreme demands on the machining center. A relatively low-cost machine can do the work. The most extreme demand is likely to be the range of five-axis motion required. This video taken at Hydrojet, a Reading, Pennsylvania, shop specializing in machining composites, shows how much five-axis motion is needed to trim a relatively simple composite component. (So that the machine’s doors could be open, this video repeats the machining cycle for a part that has already been trimmed.)

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