| 1 MINUTE READ

Videos Showcase SFP1 Probe

These two videos showcase some of the technology behind the SFP1 surface finish probe option for Renishaw's Revo five-axis measuring head.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon
Loading the player ...

The probe in the first video (top) is not the SFP1, but rather, Renishaw's RSP2 tip-scanning probe for dimensional measurement. However, the SFP1 relies on the same laser tip-sensing technology to measure surface finishes ranging from 6.3 to 0.5 Ra.

The second video (bottom) demonstrates how the Revo’s rotary B axis and the SFP1 probe’s passive C axis work together to change the orientation of the stylus.  

 

RELATED CONTENT

  • Composites Machining for the F-35

    Lockheed Martin’s precision machining of composite skin sections for the F-35 provides part of the reason why this plane saves money for U.S. taxpayers. That machining makes the plane compelling in ways that have led other countries to take up some of the cost. Here is a look at a high-value, highly engineered machining process for the Joint Strike Fighter aircraft.

  • Surface Finish: A Machinist's Tool. A Design Necessity.

    Simple "roughness" measurements remain useful in the increasingly stringent world of surface finish specifications. Here's a look at why surface measurement is important and how to use sophisticated portable gages to perform inspections on the shop floor.

  • Surface Texture From Ra to Rz

    The irregularity of a machined surface is the result of the machining process, including the choice of tool; feed and speed of the tool; machine geometry; and environmental conditions. This irregularity consists of high and low spots machined into a surface by the tool bit or a grinding wheel.