• MMS Youtube
  • MMS Facebook
  • MMS Linkedin
  • MMS Twitter
5/20/2013

Videos Showcase SFP1 Probe

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

These two videos showcase some of the technology behind the SFP1 surface finish probe option for Renishaw's Revo five-axis measuring head.

Loading the player ...


Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Related Suppliers

The probe in the first video (top) is not the SFP1, but rather, Renishaw's RSP2 tip-scanning probe for dimensional measurement. However, the SFP1 relies on the same laser tip-sensing technology to measure surface finishes ranging from 6.3 to 0.5 Ra.

The second video (bottom) demonstrates how the Revo’s rotary B axis and the SFP1 probe’s passive C axis work together to change the orientation of the stylus.  

 

Hand holding a crystal ball

We’d rather send you $15 than rely on our crystal ball…

It’s Capital Spending Survey season and the manufacturing industry is counting on you to participate! Odds are that you received our 5-minute Metalworking survey from Modern Machine Shop in your mail or email. Fill it out and we’ll email you $15 to exchange for your choice of gift card or charitable donation. Are you in the U.S. and not sure you received the survey? Contact us to access it.

Help us inform the industry and everybody benefits.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Surface Finish: A Machinist's Tool. A Design Necessity.

    Simple "roughness" measurements remain useful in the increasingly stringent world of surface finish specifications. Here's a look at why surface measurement is important and how to use sophisticated portable gages to perform inspections on the shop floor.

  • Going Lean in Order to Grow

    This shop has a plan for dramatically expanding its contract machining business in high-value markets.

  • How Accurate Is Your Machining Center?

    Virtually every machine tool builder lists, as part of a machine's specification, accuracy and repeatability figures. What's generally not given is the method used to arrive at the figures. Though these methods are defined in linear positioning standards, not all builders use the same standards.