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MC Machinery Systems Opens New Headquarters

The company hosted a festival and seminars to celebrate the Elk Grove, Illinois, grand opening.

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MC Machinery Systems hosted more than 1,000 customers, visitors and team members for the grand opening of its new headquarters in Elk Grove, Illinois, in September. The event was one of the first opportunities for customers and partners to explore the 175,000-square-foot facility, which includes a 50,000-square-foot showroom among other modern amenities.

In addition to a tour of the new facility, the company hosted a traditional Japanese drum and sake ceremony, a go-kart track, food trucks, a beer garden and a live band. MC Machinery experts and key vendors hosted 10 different seminars on best practices and trends in modern metal processing. Approximately half of all attendees went to at least one session.

“Having such a large and engaged group come to celebrate this important milestone in our company’s history was very exciting,” says Senior Marketing Manager Patrick Simon. “The successful event only added to the enthusiasm around here about the future.”

Global leaders from the Mitsubishi family of companies joined several key North American executives for the drum and sake ceremony, including CEO and President Tomoo Yoshikawa, Executive Officer Yoshikazu Miyata of Mitsubishi Electric Corp., and Division COO Terutora Urano of the Mitsubishi Corp.

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