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8/2/2017 | 1 MINUTE READ

Grippers Designed for Ultra-Low Profile Clamping

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Westec 2017: Fixtureworks will highlight its TG GripSerts carbide gripper inserts, which are designed for ultra-low-profile clamping with no dovetail workpiece preparation.

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Fixtureworks will highlight its TG GripSerts carbide gripper inserts, which are designed for ultra-low-profile clamping with no dovetail workpiece preparation. The triangular grippers have serrations which are designed for steel, hardened steel, titanium and aluminum, and feature two rows of teeth at different angles which is said to maximize the pull-down effect. Already integrated with the TriMax line of vises, which will also be featured, the workholding grippers are said to be ideal for upgrading existing vise jaws.

The company will also have its GP Series rubber gripper pads, which are contact wear points for industrial automation and positioning applications. They are made of nitrile rubber that is molded to a 0.0625" aluminum backing that can be mounted flat or contoured or formed to round or sharp corners. The pads, which are offered in strips, are designed to be customizable and easy to replace. They come in come in smooth, fine hatch or coarse hatch with standard heights of ¼"and ½". Custom sizes and counter-bore hole mounting configurations are also available.

Also featured will be a full line of fixturing accessories including grippers, rest pads, Swivots swivel/pivoting positioning components, quick release ball-lock pins, rollers and bumpers and urethane-covered bearing rollers. In addition, the company will have its lineup of manual clamps, spring plungers, rest and riser pads, levers, handles, knobs, hand wheels, supports and stops, risers, T-nuts, sliding mounts, springs, supports, grid plates, and columns, as well as a range of quick-change precision locating and mounting systems.             

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