| 1 MINUTE READ

Multipurpose Cutting Tool Reduces Cost

Arno Werkzeuge USA’s Shark-Cut line is a multipurpose cutting tool platform for a range of turning applications, enabling shops to use one tool for facing, drilling, boring and turning.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Arno Werkzeuge USA’s Shark-Cut line is a multipurpose cutting tool platform for a range of turning applications, enabling shops to use one tool for facing, drilling, boring and turning. By combining four operations into just one tool, the company says the cutting tool system offers an immediate cost savings of as much as 50 percent, eliminating the need to purchase additional cutting tools such as drills, boring bars and inserts.

The system reduces tool setup and indexing time between operations for further cost savings, efficiency and flexibility. It also creates room on the turret for other tools, so shops can maximize the productivity of their machines.

The product range features inserts that are peripherally ground and precisely pressed in grades and geometries for a variety of materials including aluminum and nonferrous, steel and high-temperature alloys. Multiple coolant ports insure cutting-edge immersion and chip evacuation.

RELATED CONTENT

  • A New Turning Process Enables Cutting “In Reverse”

    A methodology for cutting in both directions on a CNC lathe promises to make turning a much more productive operation in certain applications. New types of inserts driven by new CAM tool paths are key enablers of this development, but implementing the whole multifaceted system as a system is essential.

  • Hard Turning Might Not Be As Hard As You Think

    Turning hardened materials to grinding-like accuracies takes the right combination of part, machine and process parameters.

  • Taking The Fear Out Of Hard Turning

    To make the transition to hard turning, you'll need to switch from carbide to CBN inserts, but that is easier (and more economical) than you might think. It's making the jump to much higher surface speeds that might scare you off. It needn't. Here's why.